WICaNeM 2014 - Banner  


Call for Abstracts    
  
     Submissions    

     Critical Dates    

     Registration    

     Tracks    

     Program    

     Travel    

     Venue    

     Organisation    

     Contact    

     Links    

Back to main     -     Back to tracks








Further information:


FaceBook

Multi-Stakeholder Leadership and Governance: Facing Wicked or Complex yet Solvable Issues?

Track Coordinators: Jack Crielaard (The Social Innovation Foundation, Wageningen University), Domenico Dentoni (Global Center for Food Systems Innovation, Wageningen University), and Christopher H. Peterson (Global Innoversity, Michigan State University)

Ensure a future where up to 9 billion people will have food and consider life as being ‘good’ is the vision of young people worldwide on the future (www.Hope-XXL.com). This is also the aim of the United Nations General Assembly in 2015. Yet, the existing food and agriculture sector face urgent problems that are difficult to address, because they are scientifically uncertain, dynamically complex and involve value conflicts (Dentoni & Bitzer, 2013). Examples of this class of problems include poverty and food insecurity, violation of human rights, and deforestation and climate change. To some scholars these problems are defined as wicked problems (Peterson, 2009; Rittel & Webber, 1973)? To others these are complex issues made complicated, intractable by conflicts of interest and a constrained view on economics and, more broadly, on science.

        As we are all confronted to these questions as business leaders, academics, social innovators and policy-makers, in this track we aim to jointly co-create: how can we really contribute by connecting values and develop high level business integrity towards chain and network integrity? If this is the case, then what are the emergent properties of this higher system level (Bosker, Brakman, Garretsen, & Schramm, 2010; Lidicker, 2008) and how do we act upon these? To mention an example: is the economic region determined by cooperating chains or networks of stakeholders, or is the system boundary set by the total availability of resources?

        A new intervention is needed to create innovation and transition of systems, fulfilling the population needs in better, more sustainable ways. Technology is not the problem, but the social factors in companies and in networks are (Volberda & Van den Bosch, 2004). Today’s challenge (Hope-XXL) and today’s technological possibilities are immense. We only can contribute by putting novel operating principles into action.

        New intervention may comprise:

        • Create value across people, planet and profit
        • Engage stakeholders throughout the work
        • Experiment with innovation to co-create, learn and act
        • Create new knowledge, monitor, reflect, share and act
        • Integrate technology, human capacities and organisational/network design
(Global Innoversity, Crielaard, 2012)

        We need to demystify the roles of actors in the research, education, private and public sector (Quadruple helix). By finger pointing stakeholders, we will only wait further for the others to take action (Mazzucato, 2011). So, the central question is: who undertakes the transition?

        In this track we will establish an opportunity to work towards three main perspectives:

        1. To explore the key emerging concepts of multi stakeholder networks as building blocks for an architecture or integrated theory (science).
        2. To see what appropriate business, organisation, operation and revenue models or multi-stakeholder governance models are promising (business and science).
        3. To initiate experiments and a research agenda (entrepreneurial, business and science).

        In this track we will bring together stakeholders from different perspectives, but with a focus on the entrepreneurial practice of multi-stakeholder governance. Seven metropolitan regions, member of the Global Innoversity (Detroit, Hyderabad, Johannesburg, Nairobi, The Netherlands, Sao Paulo and Singapore), will be invited to work on their issues concerning food, agriculture and resources in new sustainable and resilient ways. We will experiment and co-create to contribute to the issues brought in by enterprises. We welcome stakeholders, especially companies, to bring in their issues for setting up new sustainable business, doing experiments and shaping a research agenda. Especially contributions from both industry and scientific research are invited.

        Please submit your research or business manager paper by January, 6th 2014 at wicanem2014@wur.nl either in full format (max 30 pages, double-spaced, font 12, excluding references, figures and tables) or in the format of outline (i.e., paper outline, max 10 pages, double-spaced, font 12, with a defined structure of the paper that highlights the intended contribution to the track and the empirical data/theoretical material available). Authors with accepted notes from the field should submit a full format paper by March 31st, 2014. All relevant dates for the conferences can be found here.

        Participants nominated as authors of the best and most innovative papers will be invited to submit their manuscripts to the conference issue of the Journal of Chain and Network Science.

  

References

Bosker, M., Brakman, S., Garretsen, H., & Schramm, M. (2010). Adding geography to the new economic geography: bridging the gap between theory and empirics. Journal of Economic Geography, 10, 793-823.

        Crielaard, J. P. (2012). Fit or Failure: Strategic fit by Employee-Market-Connection. In Social Innovation for Competitiveness, Organizational Performance and Human Excellence Rotterdam: EURAM, European Academy of Management.

        Bosker, M., Brakman, S., Garretsen, H., & Schramm, M. (2010). Adding geography to the new economic geography: bridging the gap between theory and empirics. Journal of Economic Geography, 10, 793-823.

        Crielaard, J. P. (2012). Fit or Failure: Strategic fit by Employee-Market-Connection. In Social Innovation for Competitiveness, Organizational Performance and Human Excellence Rotterdam: EURAM, European Academy of Management.

        Dentoni, D., & Bitzer, V. (2013). Dealing with Wicked Problems: Managing Corporate Social Responsibility through Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives. Manuscript under Review.

        Lidicker, W. Z. (2008). Levels of organization in biology: on the nature and nomenclature of ecology's fourth level. Biological reviews, 83, 71-78.

        Mazzucato, M. (2011). The Entrepreneurial State. London: Demos.

        Peterson, H. C. (2009). Transformational supply chains and the 'wicked problem'of sustainability: aligning knowledge, innovation, entrepreneurship, and leadership. Journal on Chain and Network Science, 9, 71-82.

        Rittel, H., & Webber, M. (1973). Dilemmas in a general theory of planning. Elsevier Policy Sciences, 155-169.

        Volberda, H. W., & Van den Bosch, F. A. J. (2004). Rethinking the Dutch Innovation Agenda:Management and Organization Matter Most. The Netherlands: Ministery of Economic Affairs.

Back to main     -     Back to tracks